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 Table of Contents  
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 126-127

Improving the blood donation practices and role of adoption of technological innovations


1 Vice-Principal Curriculum, Member of the Medical Education Unit and Medical Research Unit, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet Taluk, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth-Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet Taluk, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Web Publication30-Dec-2019

Correspondence Address:
Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth-Deemed To Be University, Tiruporur-Guduvancherry Main Road, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet Taluk, Kancheepuram - 603 108, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/digm.digm_14_19

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How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Improving the blood donation practices and role of adoption of technological innovations. Digit Med 2019;5:126-7

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Improving the blood donation practices and role of adoption of technological innovations. Digit Med [serial online] 2019 [cited 2020 Feb 24];5:126-7. Available from: http://www.digitmedicine.com/text.asp?2019/5/3/126/274378



Dear Editor,

Ensuring the provision of safe and adequate blood has been regarded as one of the major public health priorities in every nation.[1] Even though a blood transfusion can save lives, many patients fail to get a timely access to safe blood.[2] The available estimated suggest that 40% of the reported global blood donations are collected in developed nations.[1] Furthermore, 50% and 75% of blood transfusions are given to children under-5 in developing nations and elderly in developed nations, respectively.[1] In addition, 78 nations have succeeded in collecting more than 90% of their donated blood from voluntary unpaid blood donors, while 58 nations are still dependent on more than half of their blood supply from either replacement or paid donors, which is not an encouraging practice.[1]

In order to ensure that the global targets are accomplished there is an indispensable need to coordinate all the activities pertaining to blood donation right from collection to distribution have to be coordinated at the national level through an integrated blood supply network.[2],[3] These networks should be in turn governed by the National Blood Policies/Legislations to ensure standard implementation of norms and maintenance of quality and safety of blood and blood products.[1],[2] The available global estimates depict that only 70% of the nations have formulated a nationwide blood policy and their implementation has remained questionable.[1]

In addition, the health professionals should work in a concerted manner to promote blood donation from voluntary unpaid individuals, and this has to be followed up by quality assured care and counseling.[3] It is also important to ensure that all the donated blood should be screened for transfusion-transmissible infections and steps should be taken to ensure judicious use of blood and blood products.[3] Further, the quality assurance system needs to be strengthened extensively, and all the basic good laboratory practices, maintenance of records, and training of the health-care personnel have to be simultaneously improved on.[3]

In the mission to save lives of rural people in Rwanda, the stakeholders have adopted the use of drones - Zipline - to enable prompt, safe, and timely delivery of blood to all those who are in need.[4] This innovative technological approach has resulted in the significant reduction in the rates of maternal and child deaths by 75% and 66%, respectively, between the start of the current century till 2015. In order to sustain these gains, hundreds of mobile blood collection sites have been established, and the use of drones has enabled the supply of blood in remote regions of the nation. As a part of the quality assurance with regard to the maintenance of the cold chain, an electronic monitoring system has been put in place which promotes real-time monitoring of temperature and transmission of warning text messages, in case the temperature shows any variation from the permitted range.[4]

This has played an important role in saving the lives of cancer patients and in improving the rates of blood donation indirectly as people have a sense of satisfaction in saving the lives of the needy.[4],[5] The results obtained from the nation is a lesson for all the other nations, and the time has come to replicate similar technology in their own settings to make a significant progress and prevent any untoward event.[5] The observation of World Blood Donor Day each year is an attempt to enhance awareness about blood donation among the general population and promote voluntary blood donation.[1],[5]

In conclusion, blood donation is a life-saving strategy, and it is the responsibility of each and every citizen to be a part of the same. However, adoption of a technological intervention is bound to improve the rates of blood donation and save the lives of vulnerable people, and this requires sustained commitment from political stakeholders and international agencies.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
World Health Organization. Blood Safety and Availability. World Health Organization; 2019. Available from: https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/blood-safety-and-availability. [Last accessed on 2019 Jun 19].  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Makin JK, Francis KL, Polonsky MJ, Renzaho AM. Interventions to increase blood donation among ethnic/racial minorities: A systematic review. J Environ Public Health 2019;2019:6810959.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. Aiming to achieve 100% voluntary blood donation in all nations: Global vision. Ann Trop Med Public Health 2017;10:783-4.  Back to cited text no. 3
  [Full text]  
4.
World Health Organization. Drones Take Rwanda's National Blood Service to New Heights. World Health Organization; 2019. Available from: https://www.who.int/news-room/feature-stories/detail/drones-take-rwandas-national-blood-service-to-new-heights. [Last accessed on 2019 Jun 19].  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. Establishing connection among all through blood donation: Current status and public health implications. Ann Trop Med Public Health 2017;10:1357-8.  Back to cited text no. 5
  [Full text]  




 

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