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  Indian J Med Microbiol
 

Figure 4: Knitted pressure sensors tested with different pressures. Pressure was changed by either changing the area of the applied force ([INSIDE:9]) or the applied force ([INSIDE:10]). (a) Data collected using the 2.6 mm thick knitted spacer pressure sensor. The sensor was sensitive to changes pressure up to 7.8 kPa. At higher pressure, the sensor did not work. Changes in pressure by changing the applied force ([INSIDE:11]) or by changing the area over which force was applied ([INSIDE:12]), gave similar, but not identical results. (b) Data collected using the 2.8-mm thick knitted spacer pressure sensor. The sensor was constantly sensitive to changes pressure up to 20 kPa. Above this point, the sensor still functioned correctly up to 41.6 kPa when force was applied over a 7.1 × 10-4 m2 area, however gave inconsistent results when a 9.8 N of force was applied over areas of 3.1 × 10-4 m2 and 1.8 × 10-4 m2 (corresponding to 31.2 and 55.5 kPa, respectively). Changes in pressure by changing the applied force ([INSIDE:13]) or changes in the area over which force was applied ([INSIDE:14]) were in agreement with one another within the experimental error

Figure 4: Knitted pressure sensors tested with different pressures. Pressure was changed by either changing the area of the applied force ([INSIDE:9]) or the applied force ([INSIDE:10]). (a) Data collected using the 2.6 mm thick knitted spacer pressure sensor. The sensor was sensitive to changes pressure up to 7.8 kPa. At higher pressure, the sensor did not work. Changes in pressure by changing the applied force ([INSIDE:11]) or by changing the area over which force was applied ([INSIDE:12]), gave similar, but not identical results. (b) Data collected using the 2.8-mm thick knitted spacer pressure sensor. The sensor was constantly sensitive to changes pressure up to 20 kPa. Above this point, the sensor still functioned correctly up to 41.6 kPa when force was applied over a 7.1 × 10<sup>-4</sup> m<sup>2</sup> area, however gave inconsistent results when a 9.8 N of force was applied over areas of 3.1 × 10<sup>-4</sup> m<sup>2</sup> and 1.8 × 10<sup>-4</sup> m<sup>2</sup> (corresponding to 31.2 and 55.5 kPa, respectively). Changes in pressure by changing the applied force ([INSIDE:13]) or changes in the area over which force was applied ([INSIDE:14]) were in agreement with one another within the experimental error